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ONLY WEEKS AFTER PEARL HARBOR, baseball commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis placed the fate of Major League Baseball in the hands of President Franklin Roosevelt. "What do you want [baseball] to do?" Landis asked FDR. "If you believe we ought to close down for the duration of the war, we are ready to do so immediately. If you feel we ought to continue, we would be delighted to do so. We await your order."

Within two days, Landis had his answer. President Roosevelt stayed baseball's demise and gave the game a valuable gift. In the "Green Light" letter, FDR told Landis that he personally considered baseball "thoroughly worthwhile." He further encouraged the commissioner to schedule more night baseball games so day-shift workers could "see a game occasionally." With "orders" from the president, baseball initiated an energetic campaign to support the war in every conceivable way. Patriotism joined the roster. Baseball had enlisted.

  Baseball Enlists
War Threatens Baseball
Changing Uniforms
War Dominates Baseball
Baseballs Like Concrete
A New Ball Game
Uncle Sam's Teams
Baseballs in Backpacks
The Uncertainty of Peace
"If We Can Stop Bullets ..."
Rosie the Outfielder
One Man's War


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Baseball Enlists
War Threatens Baseball | Changing Uniforms
War Dominates Baseball | Baseballs Like Concrete
A New Ball Game | Uncle Sam's Teams
Baseball in Backpacks | The Uncertainty of Peace
"If We Can Stop Bullets ..." | Rosie the Outfielder
One Man's War
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